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HIGHER TAXES

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Winston
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« on: September 02, 2009, 11:32:08 am »

... now in the ill state of IL, on candy, booze and soap  (... latter two lending new relevance to the idea of "bathtub gin"?...)  Undecided
 
And typically, the law is more complicated than necessary, for example, "candy" with flour is exempt.  Hm.  Must be a TWIX lobbyist around somewhere!  Wink  (Good thing you changed those vending machines, DejaVu.)   Cheesy

Oh, and don't forget Driver's License Renewal goes up from $15 to more than double, $35, on 10-11-09!  Embarrassed
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Candy, soap, alcohol taxes take effect
BY MIKE HELENTHAL
Commercial-News
DANVILLE — If your response to recent economic trouble has been a good, stiff drink, beware: You may not be able to afford the next round.  And the same goes if eating candy or taking a nice, soapy shower makes you feel better.

Illinois on Tuesday instituted changes in the sales-tax code that include excise increases on liquor and a reclassification of certain candies and personal-hygiene items from the state’s “low rate” tax of 1 percent.

Under the changes, certain medicated soaps and shampoos that don’t require a prescription, and flourless candy, were recategorized under the state’s “high-rate” tax of 6.25 percent.

Alcohol sellers will see the steepest increase, with the tax on what liquor stores pay distributors for a gallon of wine rising from 73 cents to $1.39, and what they pay for a gallon of beer jumping from 18.5 cents to 24 cents. The hard-liquor rate will almost double from $4.50 to $8.55 a gallon.

More (with public comments at end) at      http://www.commercial-news.com/local/local_story_245014011.html
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Guardian Angel
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« Reply #1 on: September 02, 2009, 11:40:38 am »

Our local TV station reported that last night.  Seems the Liquor stores right across the state line here in Missouri and in Kentucky are stocking up for an increase in sales due to those increases in Illinois taxes.  Until Kentucky increased their cigarette taxes the people here in the tri-state area used to drive to Kentucky to buy cigarettes.
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Terry
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« Reply #2 on: September 02, 2009, 11:42:35 am »

... now in the ill state of IL, on candy, booze and soap  (... latter two lending new relevance to the idea of "bathtub gin"?...)  Undecided
 
And typically, the law is more complicated than necessary, for example, "candy" with flour is exempt.  Hm.  Must be a TWIX lobbyist around somewhere!  Wink  (Good thing you changed those vending machines, DejaVu.)   Cheesy

Oh, and don't forget Driver's License Renewal goes up from $15 to more than double, $35, on 10-11-09!  Embarrassed
Quote
Candy, soap, alcohol taxes take effect
BY MIKE HELENTHAL
Commercial-News
DANVILLE — If your response to recent economic trouble has been a good, stiff drink, beware: You may not be able to afford the next round.  And the same goes if eating candy or taking a nice, soapy shower makes you feel better.

Illinois on Tuesday instituted changes in the sales-tax code that include excise increases on liquor and a reclassification of certain candies and personal-hygiene items from the state’s “low rate” tax of 1 percent.

Under the changes, certain medicated soaps and shampoos that don’t require a prescription, and flourless candy, were recategorized under the state’s “high-rate” tax of 6.25 percent.

Alcohol sellers will see the steepest increase, with the tax on what liquor stores pay distributors for a gallon of wine rising from 73 cents to $1.39, and what they pay for a gallon of beer jumping from 18.5 cents to 24 cents. The hard-liquor rate will almost double from $4.50 to $8.55 a gallon.

More (with public comments at end) at      http://www.commercial-news.com/local/local_story_245014011.html
Winston,  you should know that the state needs that money more than you do.  They need it so they can give $40,000,000 to Chicago State University for their unwanted and unknown construction project.  Don't be so greedy by thinking that you should be able to keep some of your hard earned money.  They need that money in Chicago, so quit being so stingy.  ( hee, hee, hee )  Besides, after you're absolutely broke and need to be in intensive care, it will be free.
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Winston
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« Reply #3 on: September 02, 2009, 11:54:32 am »

Besides, after you're absolutely broke and need to be in intensive care, it will be free.
Hah!  I'm a step aheada ya -- already broke.  (Gonna hafta start drinkin bathtub water...)  Oh well, free trip to the free MRSA ward -- will look forward to it... then maybe I can sue and get rich again!  Ah, silver linings everywhere...  Grin
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Terry
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« Reply #4 on: September 02, 2009, 12:08:57 pm »

Besides, after you're absolutely broke and need to be in intensive care, it will be free.
Hah!  I'm a step aheada ya -- already broke.  (Gonna hafta start drinkin bathtub water...)  Oh well, free trip to the free MRSA ward -- will look forward to it... then maybe I can sue and get rich again!  Ah, silver linings everywhere...  Grin
See now, there's always a bright side.  If you got any rum in that bath water, I'll join you.
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« Reply #5 on: September 02, 2009, 01:17:36 pm »

So this is just additional "sin" taxes? When was the last time the "luxury" tax went up on diamonds and yahts. 
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The most successful tyranny is not the one that uses force to assure uniformity, but the one that removes awareness of other possibilities, that makes it seem inconceivable that other ways are viable, that removes the sense that there is an outside. --Allan Bloom
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« Reply #6 on: September 02, 2009, 01:27:44 pm »

Good point..................maybe we should call our reps and ask them............ Grin
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« Reply #7 on: September 02, 2009, 01:58:44 pm »

So this is just additional "sin" taxes? When was the last time the "luxuary" tax went up on diamonds and yahts. 
If they can think of it, the government will tax it.  They think everything is a sin.  Mostly, they think it's a sin if you have any money in your pocket.
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Pretender
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« Reply #8 on: September 02, 2009, 04:50:39 pm »

I think the People need to create a tax on politicians that would be paid for by the politicians!
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Bob
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« Reply #9 on: September 02, 2009, 07:33:01 pm »

I think the People need to create a tax on politicians that would be paid for by the politicians!
Brilliant!    Wink

Or how 'bout the ultimate combo Sin-tax/Diet-plan  --  for those whose obesity is due to simple gluttony, not glands or other med probs:   dollar per lb overweight, annually -- to the IRS and feds, who live off the Fat of the Land anyway...
 
(This taxing idea brought to you by your local friendly Weight-Watcher/TOPS lobbyist, otherwise known as ... a blobbyist.)
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DejaVu
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« Reply #10 on: September 02, 2009, 08:08:59 pm »

I think the People need to create a tax on politicians that would be paid for by the politicians!
Brilliant!    Wink

Or how 'bout the ultimate combo Sin-tax/Diet-plan  --  for those whose obesity is due to simple gluttony, not glands or other med probs:   dollar per lb overweight, annually -- to the IRS and feds, who live off the Fat of the Land anyway...
 
(This taxing idea brought to you by your local friendly Weight-Watcher/TOPS lobbyist, otherwise known as ... a blobbyist.)



How about instead of taxing us, government employees should give up their food and travel expenses that we are forced to pay. Lets take something away from them for a change!
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The most successful tyranny is not the one that uses force to assure uniformity, but the one that removes awareness of other possibilities, that makes it seem inconceivable that other ways are viable, that removes the sense that there is an outside. --Allan Bloom
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« Reply #11 on: September 02, 2009, 08:10:32 pm »

Where do we start lobbying for that............................. Grin
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Winston
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« Reply #12 on: September 02, 2009, 08:49:41 pm »

GA, well, Rep. Tim Johnson doesn't look like he eats much, so maybe he'd be a good start.     Wink
Now DejaVu, you know perfectly well I'm dead serious.  (Usually more dead than serious, but that must be due to all those lethal store-bought chips'n'pop.  Maybe GA has some recipes to make 'em at home ... uh... bathtub cola?  Hm ...  Cheesy)
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Battle lines drawn over soda, junk food taxes
By Lisa Baertlein
LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Increasingly vocal calls for taxes on sugary drinks and junk food are fueling a behind- the-scenes battle that public health officials say is reminiscent of America's war on cigarettes.   The U.S. obesity epidemic has blossomed into a public health crisis and overweight adolescents are starting to suffer problems that used to plague middle-aged adults -- early heart disease and type 2 diabetes.

While restaurant operators and food and soda makers promote personal responsibility and moderation, backers of the taxes say levies on foods that quickly add extra pounds are a necessary part of any successful anti-obesity effort.  Backers suggest taxes could help offset the estimated $147 billion cost of treating obesity-related diseases and fund programs to battle the expanding girths of Americans.

Adding to the pressure is the fact that cash-poor state and local governments are scrambling to raise revenue. Junk food taxes give them an opportunity to boost taxes under the guise of doing good, says Bob Goldin, executive vice president at restaurant consulting firm Technomic.   "The train has left the station," Goldin added.

SWEET SOURCE OF REVENUE

The Congressional Budget Office estimated in December that a tax of 3 cents on every 12-ounce can of soda would raise $50 billion over 10 years. Not surprisingly, a soda tax is among the revenue streams being eyed as U.S. lawmakers tackle healthcare reform.

About 58 percent of Americans are willing to bear a tax increase of 1 percent or more to support healthcare reform, according to a recent Thomson Reuters survey.  Although a debate rages over the efficacy of taxes on soda and other items, supporters point to the fall in smoking rates after taxes sent cigarette prices soaring.  "The research around tobacco has shown that large increases on taxes on cigarettes has been the single most effective policy to reduce tobacco use," said Mary Story, a dietitian and public health professor at the University of Minnesota.

Story figures that a 10 percent increase in sugar-sweetened beverage prices could cut consumption by 8 percent to 10 percent.  Taxing by the ounce would be more effective than a flat tax because it would put a larger burden on bigger soda bottles, which often sell for much less money per ounce, said Kelly Brownell, director of the Rudd Center For Food Policy and Obesity at Yale University.
More at    http://www.reuters.com/article/healthNews/idUSTRE5806E520090901


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